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Tourism competitiveness and the well-being of residents: a debate
on registered and non-registered accommodation establishments

José Francisco Perles-Ribes1*, Ana Belén Ramón-Rodríguez2 ,
Luis Moreno-Izquierdo3 and María Jesús Such-Devesa4

        
1Department of Applied Economic Analysis, Faculty of Economics and Business Sciences, University of Alicante, Campus San Vicente del Raspeig, 03080 Alicante, Spain, Tel: +34 96 590 36 09. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
2Department of Applied Economic Analysis, Faculty of Economics and Business Sciences, University of Alicante. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
3Department of Applied Economic Analysis, Faculty of Economics and Business Sciences, University of Alicante. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
4Department of Economics, Faculty of economics, business and tourism, University of Alcalá. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
*Corresponding author
   
Abstract
  
The literature on the competitiveness of tourist destinations establishes as its ultimate objective the well-being of the resident population. In Spain, the principal tourism product (sun and beach) has given rise to two basic types of destinations - those where there is a clear predominance of registered accommodation (mainly hotels) and those that are characterised by a supply largely made up of rental apartments and housing (non-registered, or sometimes known as the residential or second home model). The debate on the issue has been focusing on the different economic, social, cultural or environmental impacts that the two tourism models have on the territory. This article explores the economic aspect of the debate, comparing the differences existing in terms of income and employment in a pool of coastal destinations in the Region of Valencia, one of the leading tourism regions of the sun and beach tourism product in Spain and Europe. This comparison is done by way of Null Hypothesis Significance Testing and regression analysis. The results obtained indicate the neutrality of the composition of the accommodation supply on income and employment of destinations.
 
Keywords: competitiveness, well-being, accommodation supply, economic impact, Spain
 
CitationPerles-Ribes, J. F., Ramón-Rodríguez, A.B., Moreno-Izquierdo, L and Such-Devesa, M. J. (2020). Tourism competitiveness and the well-being of residents: a debate on registered and non-registered accommodation establishments. European Journal of Tourism Research 24, 2406.
  
 
European Journal of Тourism Research